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dc.contributor.authorGill, Rubina
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-14T22:25:10Z
dc.date.available2016-06-14T22:25:10Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11803/135
dc.description.abstractThe following autoethnography is designed to contain accounts of the researcher’s lived experiences of anxiety and healing through the human and dog relationship. The purpose of the study was to give meaning and gain a comprehensive understanding of the therapeutic qualities of the human-dog relationship on anxiety through personal experience accompanied by scholarly literature. From an evolutionary perspective, humans have bred dogs (or Canis familiaris) to fulfill a number of roles. Through this, they have developed a special relationship with humans and can have a profound impact on their psychological functioning, particularly through emotional bonding. The data was obtained through a series of self-reflections, poems, images of the researcher and her pet dog, accompanied by scholarly literature. Writing and sharing self-reflections are therapeutic for participant and reader(s), and therefore can encourage personal reflection in others as a pedagogy tool.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectAutoethnographyen_US
dc.subjectPet therapyen_US
dc.titleThe Therapeutic Effects of Dog Ownership On Anxietyen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCounselingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorCity University of Seattleen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
cityu.schoolDivision of Arts and Sciencesen_US
cityu.siteVancouver, BCen_US
cityu.site.countryCanadaen_US


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