Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorStewart, Peter
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-14T23:21:09Z
dc.date.available2016-06-14T23:21:09Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11803/142
dc.description.abstractA study of counselling practice with men who have engaged in violence against their intimate partners and dating peers is offered with a focus on consideration of elements of practice that support ethical and efficacious practice. A historical review of the dominant conceptualizations of intimate partner violence (IPV) and counselling practice with men who have engaged in IPV is provided, including how these dominant modalities have informed current treatment practice. Traditional ways of understanding IPV including feminist theory and family violence models have contributed to the integration of fundamental notions into counselling practice including gender role conflict and conformity to patriarchal power-relation norms. The application of these traditional conceptualizations of IPV in counselling practice has been methodologically lacking and unethical. Alternate notions of counselling practice are considered wherein practice is intended to support persons to consider their intrinsic desires for self, including their intimate relationships.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleEtiology and Treatment: Male Intimate Partner Violenceen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCounselingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorCity University of Seattleen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
cityu.schoolDivision of Arts and Sciencesen_US
cityu.siteVancouver, BCen_US
cityu.site.countryCanadaen_US


Files in this item

Restricted

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record