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dc.contributor.authorSingh, Reena
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-16T00:51:43Z
dc.date.available2016-06-16T00:51:43Z
dc.date.issued2014-07
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11803/174
dc.description.abstractThe South Asian population is a marginalized population group in Canada. They do not readily access mental health resources when dealing with a mental health illness. The following study is a literature review looking at different ways to incorporate religious/spiritual practices into the counselling process for South Asian immigrants. The study highlights barriers the South Asian community faces when thinking about connecting with community mental health resources. As well, the study focuses on traditional eastern practices used to treat symptoms related to mental health disorders. An appreciative inquiry approach was used to analyze qualitative studies about the research topic. Findings from the study outline clinical implications counsellors and other service providers can use when working with South Asian clients struggling with life challenges. Future research recommendations and limitations of the study are discussed. The thesis project is an extensive literature review of the available mental health resources and utilization of resources among South Asian individuals. The study looked at creative ways to promote social justice for the South Asian community.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleCounselling South Asian clients: The synergy of Western practices with Eastern philosophyen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCounselingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorCity University of Seattleen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
cityu.schoolDivision of Arts and Sciencesen_US
cityu.siteVancouver, BCen_US
cityu.site.countryCanadaen_US


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