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dc.contributor.authorSingh, Stephen
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-16T01:03:53Z
dc.date.available2016-06-16T01:03:53Z
dc.date.issued2014-07
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11803/176
dc.description.abstractThis autoethnography explores the psychosocial dynamics that have influenced my development through challenges of immigration, racism, classism, the dynamics of family systems under stress, as well as the processes of resilience and identity formation. The format allows for a demonstration of how articulated subjectivity from an individual can inform therapeutic processes for therapists and clients dealing with similar dynamics. Furthermore, the process of creating this narrative has become a tool for deconstructing negative self-perceptions, placing one's circumstances in context, and for depathologizing and decriminalizing individuals and groups. Data was interpreted theoretically from Erikson's psychosocial theory of development, supplemented by Levinson’s stage model and Moore and Gillette’s interpretation of Jungian dynamics. Conclusions point to the primacy of adaptative response, social support, and resilience when dealing with sustained systemic stressors.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectAutoethnographyen_US
dc.titleEvolution of the Grey Child: An Autoethnography of Masculine Identity Developmenten_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCounselingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorCity University of Seattleen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
cityu.schoolDivision of Arts and Sciencesen_US
cityu.siteVancouver, BCen_US
cityu.site.countryCanadaen_US


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