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dc.contributor.authorLazar, Joelle
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-20T19:55:44Z
dc.date.available2016-06-20T19:55:44Z
dc.date.issued2013-09-27
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11803/218
dc.description.abstractNeurological research demonstrates that while trauma undermines prefrontal cortical functioning, mindfulness strengthens it. A discussion on the nature of trauma is provided which includes neurobiology, attachment theory, and the sociopolitical meaning of trauma. Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and complex trauma (CT) are defined, and the differences between them are explained in the context of current research and best practices in trauma informed treatment. The physical experience of trauma, the role of memory, and implications for a person’s window of tolerance are described. A review of current research on mindfulness, and its efficacy in work with trauma survivors is developed. Aspects of trauma treatment which are beyond the scope of mindfulness are discussed, and suggestions for future research are expanded.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectTrauma
dc.subjectMindfulness
dc.titleWhen the Body is a Dangerous Place: A Map of Trauma & the Use of Mindfulness in Clinical Practiceen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCounselingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorCity University of Seattleen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
cityu.schoolDivision of Arts and Sciencesen_US
cityu.siteVancouver, BCen_US
cityu.site.countryCanadaen_US


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