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dc.contributor.authorGoldfinch, Megan
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-21T00:03:04Z
dc.date.available2016-06-21T00:03:04Z
dc.date.issued2013-09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11803/221
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this literature review is to examine the best practices for school counsellors who are supporting grieving students. The background to the problem, or why it is an issue in schools, is described as well as why it is currently a pertinent topic. To best support grieving students, school counsellors need to be familiar with various forms of grief such as normal, or uncomplicated grief, complicated grief which lasts for a longer time with more severe symptoms than normal grief and disenfranchised grief which is due to a loss that is socially unacceptable or unrecognized. Grieving also differs depending on the age and developmental level of the student. Young children will grieve differently than adolescents who will also grieve differently again when compared adults. There are various counselling techniques, such as group counselling and art therapy, that have been shown in studies to be effective in helping grieving clients, but not all are appropriate for a school setting.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectGrief counselingen_US
dc.titleBest Practices for School Counsellors Supporting Grieving Studentsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSchool Counselingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorCity University of Seattleen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Educationen_US
cityu.schoolAlbright School of Educationen_US
cityu.siteVancouver, BCen_US
cityu.site.countryCanadaen_US


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