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dc.contributor.authorLavallee, David
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-11T23:14:25Z
dc.date.available2016-07-11T23:14:25Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11803/310
dc.descriptionAuthor's name not on title-page; author information from Canada Project Thesis List.en_US
dc.description.abstractEver since the days of Hahn (founder of Outward Bound) and Lord Baden Powell (founder of the Boy Scouts movement), concerned adults have recognized large therapeutic effects of the wilderness and outdoor activities on youth. Adventure therapy began as experiential learning, or a „learning by doing‟ philosophy. In addition to the huge volume of literature on the mental health benefits of physical exercise in general, an increasing amount of research is being done on the mental health benefits of therapy in the wilderness, a relatively new domain known under various names such as wilderness therapy, adventure therapy, and outdoor behavioural health care. The field has now broadened from treatment exclusively for youth-at-risk to being sometimes adapted for use with clinical adult populations and families using a family systems approach.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectAdventure therapyen_US
dc.titleAdventure Therapy: A Program Design Based on Common Factors and Related Change Constructsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCounselingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorCity University of Seattleen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
cityu.schoolDivision of Arts and Sciencesen_US
cityu.siteVancouver, BCen_US
cityu.site.countryCanadaen_US


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