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dc.contributor.authorMcNichols, Chipo
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-02T19:57:39Z
dc.date.available2016-09-02T19:57:39Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11803/441
dc.description.abstractAttachment theory has been used as a basis for planning intervention and understanding human behaviour in relationships since it was first introduced by John Bowlby. One of the principles of the theory, “secure attachment” has been identified as being significant for the achievement of positive relationships from infancy and childhood right through to adulthood. As an opposing construct, the family systems theory of “enmeshment‟ has been identified as a maladaptive form of relating. This study examines whether the two concepts are defined based on a North American socially constructed ideal and explores the diverse meanings attributed to the concepts across different cultures and in different contexts. It also explores what implications this has for clinical practice in child and youth mental health care settings.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectAttachment theoryen_US
dc.subjectFamily systemsen_US
dc.subjectYouth counselingen_US
dc.title'Secure Attachment' and 'Enmeshment' May Be Socially Determined in Their Definitions and Applications in Child and Youth Mental Health Care Systemsen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCounselingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorCity University of Seattleen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Artsen_US
cityu.schoolDivision of Arts and Sciencesen_US
cityu.siteVancouver, BCen_US
cityu.site.countryCanadaen_US


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