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dc.contributor.authorMcKay, Sarah
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-20T00:18:48Z
dc.date.available2019-06-20T00:18:48Z
dc.date.issued2019-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11803/805
dc.description.abstractThe importance of healthy attachment, positive human connection and a well-rounded, nourishing environment during the developmental years of life play a defining role into what outcome people are likely to have as a young adult and into adulthood. When these experiences are traumatic, unhealthy, and cause immense amounts of stress, it effects the developing brain in a major way. The areas that impact day to day life which become compromised are vast, and include overall levels of hope, health, family dynamics, and social skills and abilities. It is also important to understand that even people with low or no trauma in their upbringing can still be affected when being in close proximity of someone who is suffering. It is imperative to understand the effects that trauma can have on those experiencing it personally, as well as those individuals who are exposed to the personal suffering of others and find ways to provide appropriate support to everyone effected.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectVulnerable Populationsen_US
dc.subjectA.C.E. scoresen_US
dc.subjectVicarious Traumaen_US
dc.subjectToxic Stressen_US
dc.subjectYoung Adulten_US
dc.subjectChildhooden_US
dc.subjectAt-risk youthen_US
dc.titleSystemic Support for Front Line Staff in Human Service Rolesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCounselingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorCity University of Seattleen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Counsellingen_US
cityu.schoolDivision of Arts and Sciencesen_US
cityu.siteVancouver, BCen_US
cityu.site.countryCanadaen_US


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