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dc.contributor.authorCurtis, Alex
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-10T21:11:43Z
dc.date.available2020-12-10T21:11:43Z
dc.date.issued2020-09-30
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11803/947
dc.description.abstractFirst responders perform essential, life-saving procedures in emergency situations and are continually exposed to work-place trauma. There is a 10% prevalence rate of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder among first responders and 80% of individuals diagnosed also meet the criteria for another disorder. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder can produce a wide variety of symptoms that range in severity, from increased arousal to life-like flashbacks or hallucinations. Correlations have been found between multiple exposures to trauma and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, which put first responders at high risk for developing the disorder. This paper provides evidence of such and explores multiple interventions, specifically Cognitive Behavioural Therapy and Eye-Movement Desensitization Reprocessing, that can be used to help this adversely impacted population. Due to its severity, further exploration of both prevention and treatment for victims experiencing Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder should be conducted as they are at risk for developing symptoms related to Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectPost-traumatic stress disorderen_US
dc.subjectPTSDen_US
dc.subjectTraumaen_US
dc.subjectFirst respondersen_US
dc.subjectEMDRen_US
dc.subjectCBTen_US
dc.titleThe Impact of PTSD on First Respondersen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCounselingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorCity University of Seattleen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Counsellingen_US
cityu.schoolDivision of Arts and Sciencesen_US
cityu.siteVancouver, BCen_US
cityu.site.countryCanadaen_US


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