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dc.contributor.authorLevine, Jordan
dc.date.accessioned2021-05-26T23:06:39Z
dc.date.available2021-05-26T23:06:39Z
dc.date.issued2021-03
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11803/1282
dc.description.abstractThis paper examines the emerging phenomenon of ‘incel’—or ‘involuntary celibate’—online subculture from a therapeutic perspective. Also known as ‘blackpill’ ideology, this subculture has evolved in recent years into a growing hotbed of radical apathy, nihilism, self-loathing, and—often—misogyny and antisocial bitterness, for a minimum of tens of thousands of romantically unsuccessful young males. At its most extreme, incel subculture has been implicated in a number of mass murder attempts in both North America and western Europe over the past decade. Currently, most of the information on incels and blackpill ideology that circulates in the public sphere is speculative and journalistic in nature. This entails distortions and conflations that obscure, rather than clarify, the true nature and scale of this emerging societal malaise. This paper, in contrast, aims to take as empirically-informed, and evidence-based an approach as possible to, one, introducing the topic to the mental health community, two, surveying the therapeutically-relevant extant literature, and finally, three, proposing a best-practice-based approach to conducting well-informed therapy with men and boys under the sway of blackpill thought.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectBeckyen_US
dc.subjectBlackpillen_US
dc.subjectBluepillen_US
dc.subjectChaden_US
dc.subjectForumen_US
dc.subjectHypergamyen_US
dc.subjectIncelen_US
dc.subjectInceldomen_US
dc.subjectLookismen_US
dc.subjectManosphereen_US
dc.subjectMRAen_US
dc.subjectRedditen_US
dc.subjectRedpillen_US
dc.subjectSociosexualen_US
dc.subjectStacyen_US
dc.subject4chanen_US
dc.titleIncels: Inferences on Etiology & Therapeutic Treatmenten_US
dc.typeCapstoneen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCounselingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorCity University of Seattleen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Counsellingen_US
cityu.schoolSchool of Health and Social Sciencesen_US
cityu.siteVancouver, BCen_US
cityu.site.countryCanadaen_US


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