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dc.contributor.authorRuediger, Isabel
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-03T19:06:52Z
dc.date.available2021-09-03T19:06:52Z
dc.date.issued2021-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11803/1520
dc.description.abstractFirst responders such as police, firefighters and paramedics are exposed to potentially traumatic stressors as expected variables of their occupations. These exposures are unavoidable due to the nature of responding to emergencies. Until recently, treatment of first responder’s mental health has been reactive rather than proactive. Most empirical research has been based on therapeutic modalities used to treat first responders effectively once exacerbated conditions have set in. These may include burnout, depression, substance abuse or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This project will examine current trends that focus on proactively reaching out to first responders before they become affected by serious mental health issues. Resilience has been shown to provide strong coping mechanisms in dealing with stressors of potentially traumatic events that this population is known to encounter. This paper will explore options for therapeutic prevention, postvention and treatment options in maintaining optimum mental health for first responders. Best practices for maintaining the mental health of first responders should aim to ensure a baseline resilience to prevent more serious conditions from developing.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States
dc.rightsopenAccess
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/
dc.subjectProactive mental healthen_US
dc.subjectFirst respondersen_US
dc.subjectSocioecological lensen_US
dc.subjectResiliencyen_US
dc.subjectCritical incidentsen_US
dc.subjectPotentially traumatic eventsen_US
dc.subjectNervous system activationsen_US
dc.subjectCognitive Behavioural Therapyen_US
dc.subjectBottom up modalitiesen_US
dc.subjectOrganizational structureen_US
dc.subjectSocial supporten_US
dc.subjectOuter-inner circleen_US
dc.titleResponding to First Responder Mental Healthen_US
dc.typeCapstoneen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCounselingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorCity University of Seattleen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts Counselingen_US
cityu.schoolSchool of Health and Social Sciencesen_US
cityu.siteVancouver, BCen_US
cityu.site.countryCanadaen_US


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