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dc.contributor.authorHammer, Jamie
dc.date.accessioned2021-12-15T19:58:59Z
dc.date.available2021-12-15T19:58:59Z
dc.date.issued2021-11-26
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11803/1625
dc.description.abstractInfidelity can cause a ripple effect between spouses and the entire nuclear family when children are involved. Negash and Morgan (2016) stated that infidelity has a ravaging effect on social systems, but none is more afflicted by infidelity than the nuclear family. Social systems such as the nuclear family can be damaged irreparably by decisions made solely by one individual (Negash & Morgan, 2016). Other social systems can be described as a connected network shared by people with a commonality, for example: relationships, friendships or employment. Due to infidelity being a major reason for disruption, the current research project seeks to understand the long and short-term impact of parental infidelity on the family structure.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States
dc.rightsopenAccess
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/
dc.subjectInfidelityen_US
dc.subjectFamiliesen_US
dc.titleThe Impact of Infidelity on the Family Systemen_US
dc.typeCapstoneen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCounselingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorCity University of Seattleen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts Counselingen_US
cityu.schoolSchool of Health and Social Sciencesen_US
cityu.siteCalgaryen_US
cityu.site.countryCanadaen_US


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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States