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dc.contributor.authorGordon, Karra
dc.date.accessioned2021-12-15T20:13:47Z
dc.date.available2021-12-15T20:13:47Z
dc.date.issued2021-11-23
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11803/1627
dc.description.abstractAttrition rates, or the number of individuals who leave the teaching profession, have been a continuing problem nationwide with novice teachers (i.e., those in their first 5 years of the profession) creating fiscal and educational hardships. The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine the ways veteran and novice teachers are matched during the mentoring process of induction programs. Mentors are veteran teachers who are matched with a novice or new teacher to assist in the process of professional acclimation. The principal theoretical frameworks guiding this study are those of mentor matching and mentor effectiveness. This research study used qualitative methodology and a phenomenology design to explore the phenomenon of mentorship in the scope of induction programs. The fundamental components of this study can be found in the research questions, which examined the novice teachers’ experiences with their mentors, the novice teachers' perceptions of self-efficacy as a teacher, and whether the novice teachers intend to stay in the teaching profession. The population of this study consisted of 43 teachers in District V, located in California, who completed the induction program. The researcher attempted to use proportional stratification sampling; however, certain limitations led to the sample consisting of all 11 teachers who responded to an initial survey. Data were collected through semistructured interviews and then analyzed using the thematically based process of coding. Six common themes including induction program components, realistic perspectives, mentor characteristics, genuine connection, empathy, and validation were identified. The mentorship in District V’s induction program did not impact novice teachers’ desires to stay in the profession; however, it did positively impact the mentees’ perceptions of self-efficacy and resilience.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States
dc.rightsopenAccess
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/
dc.subjectMentor-Mentee matchingen_US
dc.subjectMentorshipen_US
dc.subjectNovice teacheren_US
dc.subjectResilienceen_US
dc.subjectSelf-efficacyen_US
dc.subjectAttritionen_US
dc.subjectInduction programen_US
dc.titleMentorship Matching: An Exploration of How Mentor-Mentee Matching Effects Resilience, Self-Efficacy, and Attrition in Novice Teachersen_US
dc.typeDissertationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Leadershipen_US
thesis.degree.grantorCity University of Seattleen_US
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Educationen_US
cityu.schoolSchool of Education and Leadershipen_US
cityu.siteSeattleen_US
cityu.site.countryUnited Statesen_US


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