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dc.contributor.authorFast, Jonathan
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-03T22:18:18Z
dc.date.available2016-06-03T22:18:18Z
dc.date.issued2016-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11803/40
dc.description.abstractEducational research pertaining to engagement has traditionally been student-focused. There are many techniques (when implemented properly) that are proven to increase the engagement levels of students to their learning, including Project/Problem-Based Learning (PBL), Distributed-Learning, Flipped-Classroom, and other experiential, student-centred initiatives. It is assumed, however, that all teachers are involved in the process of continually creating engaging classrooms. Teachers, like students, can become disengaged in their work for many reasons. Once disengaged, it is difficult to inspire these teachers to go beyond their comfort zone and engage in the process of learning as they once had. I suggest that educational leadership needs to focus their efforts on increasing teacher-engagement which will have a direct impact on the desired outcome of increasing student-engagement. A student who is engaged in their learning has a teacher who is engaged in teaching.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States
dc.rightsopenAccess
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/
dc.titleDoes Focussing on the Engagement of Teachers Produce Better Engagement of Students?en_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Leadershipen_US
thesis.degree.grantorCity University of Seattleen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Educationen_US
cityu.schoolAlbright School of Educationen_US
cityu.siteVancouver, BCen_US
cityu.site.countryCanadaen_US


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