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dc.contributor.authorGarner, Carrie
dc.date.accessioned2020-12-10T22:50:22Z
dc.date.available2020-12-10T22:50:22Z
dc.date.issued2020-11-18
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11803/949
dc.descriptionIt was clear that when I responded to class disruptions and misbehaviors my students did not respond as seriously to my requests as they did my mentor teacher. I was worried that if I could not elicit the same response as her, proper boundaries would be missing that allow me to teach in the intricate world of on-line learning. Through reflective professional development, I discovered ways to mitigate disruptions and misbehaviors during class addressing my own need to firmly set boundaries with elementary aged children and decipher between real student needs and excuses in an on-line environment. A literature review was conducted to examine studies on situations teachers might encounter in relation to student misbehaviors. I simultaneously reflected on my own growth and changed response tactics and shared those experiences from my personal journals. I reflected on three cycles: teacher attributions, teacher confidence, and setting rules and boundaries when implementing a token system. I looked at everyday disruptions and how my own thoughts and actions transformed through research and mentor feedback, this allowed me to feel more confident in the management of my classroom.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis is a professional development study using action research protocol to deepen inquiry and reflection. The focus is on the educator’s learning with the intent to influence student learning and behavior. The context that prompted the inquiry was the barriers that were preventing myself from having the confidence to address misbehaviors in a remote learning environment while mitigating acting out, the same as the mentor teacher can do. The study focuses on four main themes: teacher attributions, student-teacher relationships, teacher confidence, and establishing rules and boundaries in the classroom. Feedback structures that influenced reflection and deepening of inquiry include personal journals and mentor feedback. I have changed the way that I think about disruptions in the class. I have started asking myself if the students know the rules, do they understand what is being asked of them, am I responding at the appropriate time, and I am creating a positive classroom environment through building a relationship with the student. I believe I have gained a lot of confidence to go into a classroom on my own and recognize the importance of professional growth in order to expand the teacher toolbox to become a more effective teacher.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 United States
dc.rightsopenAccess
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/
dc.subjectAttributionsen_US
dc.subjectMisbehavioren_US
dc.subjectTeach responsesen_US
dc.subjectStudent-Teacher relationshipsen_US
dc.subjectClassroom managementen_US
dc.titleA Professional Development Study of a New Teacher's Responses to Misbehavioren_US
dc.typeAction Researchen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineTeachingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorCity University of Seattleen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster in Teachingen_US
cityu.schoolAlbright School of Educationen_US
cityu.siteRentonen_US
cityu.site.countryUnited Statesen_US


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