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dc.contributor.authorMontsion, Lise
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-24T00:28:12Z
dc.date.available2021-02-24T00:28:12Z
dc.date.issued2021-02-09
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11803/985
dc.description.abstractThis paper focuses on treatment programs for individuals who have perpetrated intimate partner violence (IPV). Factors that contribute to IPV are explored as well as the current treatment models in Canada and the United States. Implications of this research suggest that future treatment programs should include categorizing individuals who have perpetrated IPV into subgroups. These subgroups should be based on the individual's presenting issues in addition to IPV perpetration. Examples of subgroups include individuals who might the criteria for substance use disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, borderline personality disorder, those low in psychopathy, and those high in psychopathy. Future research should focus on the piloting of specialized treatment programs based on their subgroup assignment and treat presenting issues simultaneously to increase efficacy.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectIntimate partner violenceen_US
dc.subjectDomestic violenceen_US
dc.subjectTreatmenten_US
dc.titleTreatment Programs for Individuals who have Perpetrated Intimate Partner Violenceen_US
dc.typeCapstoneen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCounselingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorCity University of Seattleen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Counsellingen_US
cityu.schoolSchool of Arts and Sciencesen_US
cityu.siteCalgaryen_US
cityu.site.countryCanadaen_US


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